TRUTH by Hector Macdonald Read by Robert Fass – Audiobook Excerpt by HachetteAudio

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“In a time when truth is under assault, Hector Macdonald is here to defend it. He offers clear-eyed, compelling guidelines for becoming a more accurate consumer and producer of information.”–Adam Grant, author of Give and Take, Originals, and Option B with Sheryl Sandberg

For fans of Nudge, Sway, and The Art of Thinking Clearly, a fascinating dive into the many ways in which “competing truths” shape our opinions, behaviors, and beliefs.

True or false? It’s rarely that simple.

There is more than one truth about most things. The Internet disseminates knowledge but it also spreads hatred. Eating meat is nutritious but it’s also damaging to the environment. When we communicate we naturally select the truths that are most helpful to our agenda.

We can select truths constructively to inspire organizations, encourage children, and drive progressive change. Or we can select truths that give a false impression of reality, misleading people without actually lying. Others can do the same, motivating or deceiving us with the truth. Truths are neutral but highly versatile tools that we can use for good or ill.

In Truth: How the Many Sides to Every Story Shape Our Reality, Hector Macdonald explores how truth is used and abused in politics, business, the media and everyday life. He shows how a clearer understanding of truth’s many faces renders us better able to navigate our world and more influential within it. Combining great storytelling with practical takeaways and a litany of fascinating, funny, and insightful case studies, Truth is a sobering and engaging read about how profoundly our mindsets and actions are influenced by the truths that those around us choose to tell.

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Available March 6, 2018 from Hachette Audio as a digital download, and in Print and Ebook from Little, Brown and Company.

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QUIRKY by Melissa A Schilling Read by Erin Bennett – Audiobook Excerpt by HachetteAudio

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The science behind the traits and quirks that drive creative geniuses to make spectacular breakthroughs

What really distinguishes the people who literally change the world–those creative geniuses who give us one breakthrough after another? What differentiates Marie Curie or Elon Musk from the merely creative, the many one-hit wonders among us?

Melissa Schilling, one of the world’s leading experts on innovation, invites us into the lives of eight people–Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin, Elon Musk, Dean Kamen, Nikola Tesla, Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, and Steve Jobs–to identify the traits and experiences that drove them to make spectacular breakthroughs, over and over again. While all innovators possess incredible intellect, intellect alone, she shows, does not create a breakthrough innovator. It was their personal, social, and emotional quirkiness that enabled true genius to break through–not just once but again and again.

Nearly all of the innovators, for example, exhibited high levels of social detachment that enabled them to break with norms, an almost maniacal faith in their ability to overcome obstacles, and a passionate idealism that pushed them to work with intensity even in the face of criticism or failure. While these individual traits would be unlikely to work in isolation–being unconventional without having high levels of confidence, effort, and goal directedness might, for example, result in rebellious behavior that does not lead to meaningful outcomes–together they can fuel both the ability and drive to pursue what others deem impossible.

Schilling shares the science behind the convergence of traits that increases the likelihood of success. And, as Schilling also reveals, there is much to learn about nurturing breakthrough innovation in our own lives–in, for example, the way we run organizations, manage people, and even how we raise our children.
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Available February 13, 2018 from Hachette Audio as a digital download, and in Print and Ebook from Public Affairs.

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QUIRKY by Melissa A Schilling Read by Erin Bennett – Audiobook Excerpt by HachetteAudio

http://ift.tt/2GxRO3E

The science behind the traits and quirks that drive creative geniuses to make spectacular breakthroughs

What really distinguishes the people who literally change the world–those creative geniuses who give us one breakthrough after another? What differentiates Marie Curie or Elon Musk from the merely creative, the many one-hit wonders among us?

Melissa Schilling, one of the world’s leading experts on innovation, invites us into the lives of eight people–Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin, Elon Musk, Dean Kamen, Nikola Tesla, Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, and Steve Jobs–to identify the traits and experiences that drove them to make spectacular breakthroughs, over and over again. While all innovators possess incredible intellect, intellect alone, she shows, does not create a breakthrough innovator. It was their personal, social, and emotional quirkiness that enabled true genius to break through–not just once but again and again.

Nearly all of the innovators, for example, exhibited high levels of social detachment that enabled them to break with norms, an almost maniacal faith in their ability to overcome obstacles, and a passionate idealism that pushed them to work with intensity even in the face of criticism or failure. While these individual traits would be unlikely to work in isolation–being unconventional without having high levels of confidence, effort, and goal directedness might, for example, result in rebellious behavior that does not lead to meaningful outcomes–together they can fuel both the ability and drive to pursue what others deem impossible.

Schilling shares the science behind the convergence of traits that increases the likelihood of success. And, as Schilling also reveals, there is much to learn about nurturing breakthrough innovation in our own lives–in, for example, the way we run organizations, manage people, and even how we raise our children.
——–

Available February 13, 2018 from Hachette Audio as a digital download, and in Print and Ebook from Public Affairs.

Download:
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When Likes Aren’t Enough, Written and Read by Tim Bono by OrionBooks

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When a group of researchers asked young adults around the globe what their number one priority was in life, the top answer was “happiness.” Not success, fame, money, looks or love… but happiness. For a rising generation of young people raised as digital natives in a fast-paced, ultra-connected world, authentic happiness still seems just out of reach. While social media often shows well-lit selfies and flawless digital personas, today’s 16 to 25-year olds are struggling to find real meaning, connection, and satisfaction right alongside their overburdened parents.

When Likes Aren’t Enough tackles the ever-popular subject of happiness and well-being, but reframes it for a younger reader struggling with Instagram envy and exam pressures, university and job rejections and overprotective parents. Professor of positive psychology Dr Tim Bono distills his students’ most popular course on the science of happiness into creative, often counterintuitive, strategies for millenials and future generations to lead happier, more fulfilling lives.

Filled with exciting research, practical exercises, honest advice, and quotes from young adults themselves, When Likes Aren’t Enough is a master class for a generation looking for science-based, real world coping methods to feel just a little bit happier every day.

Read by Tim Bono
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What we can learn from the “dinosaurs of marriage” by UC Science Today

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In 1989, UC Berkeley psychologist Robert Levenson began to study a group of people who had been married at least 15 years or 35 years, depending on age, to get a better sense of what fairly successful marriages are like. This was not purely a behavioral study, as they also managed to collect genetic samples from many of these 156 couples. In this interview excerpt, Levenson explains the implications for future couples.

Robert Levenson:
“Well, one of the things that motivated us to do this study is that we felt this might be the last opportunity to study the dinosaurs of marriage. The people who had 50 years with a particular person. And at the time we started in the 80s it looked like the divorce rate was reaching 65 percent in this country. Seven out of 10 marriages ending in divorce. And so here was a group that grew up in a different era and had you know sort of stayed together and we wanted to understand them just in case they disappeared from the earth.

Well, I think things are different now and you know we’re in this period of flux in marriage. A lot of people don’t marry. The divorce rate has gone back down again to 50 percent. I don’t know whether the modal marriage for the millennial generation will be, you know, marry once, marry twice, marry three times. But I think the basic biology here, the relationship between behavior and biology doesn’t require you to be married.

You know this is a statement about what counts in terms of your being happy in a relationship. And although our tools may not be strong enough to detect these in the first and second and third years, I still expect that these genetic influences are having the same effects on relationships today as they did, you know, 20 and 40 years ago in those marriages.”

Branin/host:
“Right and as you say with the dinosaurs, I mean I think that’s the joke, you know, people will say about their grandparents – they stuck together even though they didn’t seem very happy and yet they did.”

Robert Levenson:
“Now that might happen again. You know we go through these pendular kinds of sociological changes and for a while it seemed like we were in sort of a casual relationship. People lived together, they didn’t marry, but who knows what it’s going to be like in the future. And who knows probably the best bet is the pendulum will swing back and maybe people will form better marriages and will find ways of making better mate selection. And maybe even genes will play a role in that.

And you know you’ll go and you’ll talk to your grandma and your grandpa and they’ll give you advice and then you’ll go to your geneticist and she’ll give you advice and you’ll put that all together in this kind of unique algorithm that will say okay I’m going to go this way. And then if you’re smart you’ll listen. And if you’re not you’ll say ah, I know best. I’m just going to marry whoever I want to. But I don’t think human nature is going to get re-writ in any particular, you know, in any short period of time.”

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What we can learn from the “dinosaurs of marriage” by UC Science Today

http://ift.tt/2Eqe6Uu

In 1989, UC Berkeley psychologist Robert Levenson began to study a group of people who had been married at least 15 years or 35 years, depending on age, to get a better sense of what fairly successful marriages are like. This was not purely a behavioral study, as they also managed to collect genetic samples from many of these 156 couples. In this interview excerpt, Levenson explains the implications for future couples.

Robert Levenson:
“Well, one of the things that motivated us to do this study is that we felt this might be the last opportunity to study the dinosaurs of marriage. The people who had 50 years with a particular person. And at the time we started in the 80s it looked like the divorce rate was reaching 65 percent in this country. Seven out of 10 marriages ending in divorce. And so here was a group that grew up in a different era and had you know sort of stayed together and we wanted to understand them just in case they disappeared from the earth.

Well, I think things are different now and you know we’re in this period of flux in marriage. A lot of people don’t marry. The divorce rate has gone back down again to 50 percent. I don’t know whether the modal marriage for the millennial generation will be, you know, marry once, marry twice, marry three times. But I think the basic biology here, the relationship between behavior and biology doesn’t require you to be married.

You know this is a statement about what counts in terms of your being happy in a relationship. And although our tools may not be strong enough to detect these in the first and second and third years, I still expect that these genetic influences are having the same effects on relationships today as they did, you know, 20 and 40 years ago in those marriages.”

Branin/host:
“Right and as you say with the dinosaurs, I mean I think that’s the joke, you know, people will say about their grandparents – they stuck together even though they didn’t seem very happy and yet they did.”

Robert Levenson:
“Now that might happen again. You know we go through these pendular kinds of sociological changes and for a while it seemed like we were in sort of a casual relationship. People lived together, they didn’t marry, but who knows what it’s going to be like in the future. And who knows probably the best bet is the pendulum will swing back and maybe people will form better marriages and will find ways of making better mate selection. And maybe even genes will play a role in that.

And you know you’ll go and you’ll talk to your grandma and your grandpa and they’ll give you advice and then you’ll go to your geneticist and she’ll give you advice and you’ll put that all together in this kind of unique algorithm that will say okay I’m going to go this way. And then if you’re smart you’ll listen. And if you’re not you’ll say ah, I know best. I’m just going to marry whoever I want to. But I don’t think human nature is going to get re-writ in any particular, you know, in any short period of time.”

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Or, listen to several experts, including Levenson, describe our brain in love in this discussion:
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There are benefits to letting your mind wander. by UC Science Today

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It’s a workday, just after lunch. You have a deadline and there’s plenty of time left in the day to get the task done. If only you could stop thinking about other things. One thought can lead to your mind just…wandering away. This can’t be good, right? You’ve probably been scolded as a kid for daydreaming in class. But in recent years, neuroscientists and psychologists have found that there are some very redeeming qualities to this mental state – in fact, it could be an essential cognitive skill. Here’s an excerpt from an interview conducted with one of those researchers.

AUDIO:
“I’m Jonathan Schooler. I’m a professor of psychological and brain sciences, here at the University of California, Santa Barbara. And I study a whole lot of different things, but one of my major interests is mind wandering ..”

FULL TRANSCRIPT COMING SOON.
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