Capitalism Without Capital by RSA Events

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What has led to the rise of the ‘intangible economy’? And what impact is it having on levels of inequality and productivity? Economic analysts Stian Westlake and Jonathan Haskel investigate.

For all sorts of businesses, from tech firms and pharma companies to coffee shops and gyms, the ability to deploy assets that one can neither see nor touch is increasingly the main source of long-term success. What does the future of an intangible world look like, and how can managers, investors, and policymakers exploit the characteristics of an intangible age to grow our companies and economies?

This event was recorded live at The RSA on Thursday 23rd November 2017. Discover more about this event here: http://ift.tt/2iKghJx
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Capitalism Without Capital by RSA Events

http://ift.tt/2B61oIn

What has led to the rise of the ‘intangible economy’? And what impact is it having on levels of inequality and productivity? Economic analysts Stian Westlake and Jonathan Haskel investigate.

For all sorts of businesses, from tech firms and pharma companies to coffee shops and gyms, the ability to deploy assets that one can neither see nor touch is increasingly the main source of long-term success. What does the future of an intangible world look like, and how can managers, investors, and policymakers exploit the characteristics of an intangible age to grow our companies and economies?

This event was recorded live at The RSA on Thursday 23rd November 2017. Discover more about this event here: http://ift.tt/2iKghJx
via IFTTT

Capitalism Without Capital by RSA Events

http://ift.tt/2B61oIn

What has led to the rise of the ‘intangible economy’? And what impact is it having on levels of inequality and productivity? Economic analysts Stian Westlake and Jonathan Haskel investigate.

For all sorts of businesses, from tech firms and pharma companies to coffee shops and gyms, the ability to deploy assets that one can neither see nor touch is increasingly the main source of long-term success. What does the future of an intangible world look like, and how can managers, investors, and policymakers exploit the characteristics of an intangible age to grow our companies and economies?

This event was recorded live at The RSA on Thursday 23rd November 2017. Discover more about this event here: http://ift.tt/2iKghJx
via IFTTT

Capitalism Without Capital by RSA Events

http://ift.tt/2B61oIn

What has led to the rise of the ‘intangible economy’? And what impact is it having on levels of inequality and productivity? Economic analysts Stian Westlake and Jonathan Haskel investigate.

For all sorts of businesses, from tech firms and pharma companies to coffee shops and gyms, the ability to deploy assets that one can neither see nor touch is increasingly the main source of long-term success. What does the future of an intangible world look like, and how can managers, investors, and policymakers exploit the characteristics of an intangible age to grow our companies and economies?

This event was recorded live at The RSA on Thursday 23rd November 2017. Discover more about this event here: http://ift.tt/2iKghJx
via IFTTT

Capitalism Without Capital by RSA Events

http://ift.tt/2B61oIn

What has led to the rise of the ‘intangible economy’? And what impact is it having on levels of inequality and productivity? Economic analysts Stian Westlake and Jonathan Haskel investigate.

For all sorts of businesses, from tech firms and pharma companies to coffee shops and gyms, the ability to deploy assets that one can neither see nor touch is increasingly the main source of long-term success. What does the future of an intangible world look like, and how can managers, investors, and policymakers exploit the characteristics of an intangible age to grow our companies and economies?

This event was recorded live at The RSA on Thursday 23rd November 2017. Discover more about this event here: http://ift.tt/2iKghJx
via IFTTT

How to protect artificial intelligence technology from hackers by UC Science Today

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Artificial Intelligence has been developing fast – and it’s making more and more decisions on humans’ behalf. From simple web searches to e-commerce to self-driving cars. But researchers like Dawn Song, a computer scientist at the University of California, Berkeley, are struggling to find the best ways to protect this technology from hackers.

“One thing we are looking at how we can use AI and deep learning techniques to develop stronger security capabilities to enable us to build better defenses. One of our recent works uses advanced deep learning techniques to try to identify software vulnerabilities in IOT devises.”

Deep learning techniques are advanced algorithms, which allow researchers to process massive amounts of data.

“The advantage of deep learning is that it can enable us to build very large data sets. And now we have very good computation framework and hardware to perform a variety of tasks.”

But as machines becomes smarter, so do viruses that attack them, so scientists are challenged to stay one step ahead of hackers.
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RSA President’s Lecture: The Technologist’s Dilemma by RSA Events

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Mustafa Suleyman, co-founder and Head of Applied AI at DeepMind, considers what tech companies have got wrong, how to fix it, and how to ensure they contribute to greater economic and social justice.

It’s no secret that technology companies are changing the world. But as technology plays a larger role in key social institutions we value and revere—from healthcare to electoral politics—guaranteeing a positive impact on society has become far more complex than many in the sector ever imagined.

This event was recorded live at The RSA on Tuesday 14th November 2017. Discover more about this event here: http://ift.tt/2iZOuUO
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